A quick post to indicate to those interested in corruption law and research that the University of Surrey’s School of Law website has released an updated database on corruption materials with links to international and domestic instruments in the Field.

The last version of the database provides links to the corruption laws of the Commonwealth and EU countries.

See the Corruption website and the Database

We are happy to announce the publication of a research paper in the Surrey Law Working Paper Series dealing with the 2003 United Nations Convention against Corruption (UNCAC) and the 2003 African Union Convention on Corruption (AUC).

The abstract reads as follows:

Adopted in 2003, the African Union Convention on Preventing and Combating Corruption (AUC), and the United Nations Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC) are the most recent examples of international initiatives aiming at tackling corruption.
The adoption of  these conventions is an important step in the fight against corruption and this working paper considers to what extent they represent a strong basis for tackling corruption, as well as why strong implementation measures remain essential. Section 1, examines the scope of the two conventions, highlights the lack of a legal definition of corruption as well as strong similarities with regards to the conventions’ objectives, and considers the limits of the means of actions provided by the conventions. Section 2 examines how practical measures such as codes of conduct, asset declarations, social and economic reforms, reliance on the private sector or cooperation, are suitable to tackle corruption. The paper concludes with the argument that strict implementation of existing measures remains the best mean to fight corruption in developing countries.

A. Martin, Implementation as the Best Way to Tackle Corruption: A Study of the UNCAC and the AUC 2003 (February 1, 2011). Surrey Law Working Paper No. 07/2011.

The full research paper can be downloaded here.

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